No Holds Barred: Trump Threatening South Carolina Lawmakers, Others Regarding a New Healthcare Bill

Love him or hate him, Donald Trump is a man who is doing everything he can to deliver on his campaign promises. He might still have a bit of that “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” wet-behind-the-ears mystique, but his non-political background is making a number of South Carolina lawmakers uncomfortable.

The 45th President used a GOP luncheon to jokingly threaten senators and congressmen. Trump’s attempt at humor elicited nervous laughter from many of the senators, including Dean Heller from Nevada. Many of the South Carolina lawmakers had to be nervous as well, considering that this president has developed a pattern of threatening them for leverage.

The goal of repealing and replacing the Affordable Care is weighing heavily on Trump’s mind, because earlier in the year he had already realized that getting a new bill passed was reaching a stalemate. That is probably why he went on record for a thinly-veiled threat against South Carolina Congressman Mark Sanford.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, also a former South Carolina Representative, is on record for telling Sanford that “the President [Trump] hopes that you vote against this because he wants to run somebody against you if you do.”

Of course, depending on what side of the political spectrum one is one, the track record of this president will either be seen as bold activity or activity from a bully. But for a man who has always done things his own way, he has demonstrated that he will get things done his way and in a manner that just might be the polar opposite of one of his predecessors the Great Communicator Ronald Reagan.

A man like Donald Trump is used to being in the trenches of New York Real Estate, so when he makes a threat it is simply par for the course. Even one of his former opponents had to admit it: “Listen, the president has his own way of communicating,” admitted Texas Senator Ted Cruz. It will be interesting to see how this battle plays out for sure.

Food Truck Team From Charleston, SC To Compete In “The Great Food Truck Race”

A recently published article in this month’s issue of the Food Network Magazine announces the return this summer of the popular Food Network show The Great Food Truck Race (Sunday, August 20th, 9 PM, Food Network channel.) The article, THE HEAT IS ON FOR NEW ROSTER OF FOOD TRUCK HOPEFULS IN RETURN OF THE GREAT FOOD TRUCK RACE (July 14, 2017) which describes the show as a “Six-Episode Culinary Battle,” hosted by Tyler Florence will be visiting “Food Cities of the South.”

The team from Charleston, South Carolina calls it’s food truck “Braised in the South” and the team is made up of Nick Hunter, Steven Klatt and Brandon Lapp. They will compete against teams from Philadelphia, PA, Cherry Hill, NJ, Dallas, TX, Little Rock, Arkansas, Rogersville, TN, and Falmouth, MA. The show returns to “Southern-Style” in which the teams will be competing for $50,000.00. The show promises beautiful scenery, southern landmarks and intense food challenges.

The first episode will greet the teams in the French Quarter of New Orleans.” Their journey will be routed through Pensacola, FL, Tuscaloosa, AL, Nashville, TN, and Athens, GA.

A search on FoodNetwork.com of South Carolina brought up some great South Carolina Recipes which starts with a recipe by the shows host, Tyler Florence, “South Carolina She-Crab Soup”. When you go to this recipe link you will see that this recipe was from another show on Food Network, Food 911 in an episode called Crab Soup In Greenville, SC.

Let’s root for the Charleston, SC team of Nick Hunter, Steven Klatt and Brandon Lapp. in their “Braised in the South” food truck on Sunday, August 20th!

The Journey to Integrate Robots into Human Activities

Academics have put forward an argument that it is becoming more and more urgent to fit robots with the appropriate safety measures as their interaction with human beings increases every day. They have suggested that robots should be fitted with black boxes to monitor their movements and decisions. This measure will at least be able to help their makers diagnose their faultiness when accidents happen. This urgency has been created by the use of robots far from their typical roles in industries. Nowadays, they work side by side with human as security guards, customer assistants, or even driverless cars.

The scientists’ case to have the robots fitted with ‘ethical black boxes’ will be discussed further at the University of Surrey conference on robots. In this meeting, it is expected that both scientists and robot experts will have a discourse on the steps that have been taken to ensure that autonomous robots can work and make rational decisions without having to be monitored. The conference came in the wake of an incident where a robot had an accident as it was patrolling in Georgetown, Washington DC. The robot was guarding a riverside complex when it accidentally fell down the stairs and sunk into a fountain.

It is not always that accidents involving robots are casualty-free. A man was killed on the road after turning on an autopilot feature in his car. The car was unable to perceive a truck in front of its path and caused a fatal crash. Winfield and Marina Jirotka have been at the forefront of advocating for the fitting of black boxes in robots. The latter, a professor at the Oxford University, reckons that accidents involving robots will require investigation. However, this is impossible if there is no record whatsoever of the robots thinking patterns at the time of the accident. The fitting of black boxes will, hence, go along the way into also helping the robots explain their actions to humans in a straightforward language.